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What Serves You?
By Art Ramsay

 Do you often ask or ever think about why you are here? For people seeking spiritual 'growth', it is a question thought about frequently; for the 'mainstream' population, it most likely is rare or non-existent. Those who are 'in-between', probably wonder about this question occasionally. For this article, I will assume you have asked this question of yourself at least once.

Another question that may precede, or follow, the first is 'who am I?'. This question is one that takes deep thought, and may take years to answer. While the first question above may seem to come from you, it is more likely being prompted by a Higher Aspect of you. The second question may come from you (your ego mind), but the answer cannot come from you. It must come from a Higher state of mind from within.


This article is about the first question: why am I here, or what is my purpose for being here? Since we are spiritual beings having a physical experience, we must have planned this Earthly adventure for a reason; it did not just happen. Most of the world's population, however, views it this way, and so this idea that we are born, live so many years, then die with no purpose whatsoever (and its variations) is what has been taught and handed down to us.

I have spoken about a question many people ask, mostly in frustration, 'is this all there is?' often in other articles. If this question is asked, then the one this article is about must follow. There may be a single answer as to why you are here, but it may take sorting through ideas that come to you about the answer.

The preceding paragraphs may have sounded like my rambling about the subject, but I wanted you to be clear about this idea of why we are here, which is different for each one of us. I discussed this subject in a different way in a previous article; this one has a twist. My premise is that we came here to serve each other in different and assorted ways.

If this premise is true then how can we determine what our service is, because to serve another is how we grow and serve ourselves. Service is recognized in almost every nation, religion, and culture in the world as a way to happiness and self-fulfillment. So this idea is not debatable. How we choose what we do is the aspect of service that fulfills us or not.

Let's look at a few aspects of what you can do to choose a way to serve. You may
actually already be doing it. First, answer the following questions:

* What do I enjoy doing the most right now?
* What have I enjoyed doing the most in the past?
* What would I enjoy doing the most in the future?

Now look for a common thread from your answers. You may not be able to complete this part of the exercise immediately; it may take awhile to single out one thing that gives you the most satisfaction and enjoyment. Once you have found the one activity that opens your heart and raises your vibration, write it down. Now let it sit for a week or two. Then go back and repeat the above exercise.

Do you get the same most enjoyable 'activity' as the first time? If yes, let it sit for another week or two, and repeat the exercise one more time. Do you get the same activity the third time? If you get a 'no' either of the second or third time, then continue to repeat the exercise until you get the same one three times in a row. Like I said, it may take some time.

The above process was to flush out your ego mind and get to the core of what your passion is. Your passion, what fulfills you is the key to how you can serve others in your best possible way. If you already know your passion, and you are sure about it, then you can skip the above and continue with what follows.

Now that you have found your core passion, mine is writing, you can look at how it can fuel your service to others. If what you love to do does not seem to fit doing it for other people, then look at how a subset of your passion would. Play with this for awhile, because somewhere within what you are passionate about is your service.

You may find that you have what I call subsets or offshoots of your passion. Playing with these ideas will uncover what you can be doing that will make you and others happy. Let's look at a few simple examples; this will help you get started.

You are a mother of two children, and your passion is teaching. You can use this passion to teach your children what they can do to be happy wherever they are and whatever they are doing. Or if you are a school teacher, besides teaching the normal curriculum you may help the kids feel good about themselves.

You discover your passion is music. You work in a legal office where it can get hectic and sometimes boring. You come up with the idea of having background music in the office that is uplifting and sparks people's creativity.

Your passion is writing. You have just retired from an office where you wrote technical papers and equipment testing procedures. You begin writing fiction as a hobby, and then move into non-fiction papers on how to fix your own electronic equipment.

I could go on with thousands of examples, but the above gives you an idea about what I am discussing here. You must first find you passion by using what I outlined in the first part of this article. Your passion might be the same as it was when you were ten, or it has shifted several times throughout your life. But somewhere within those shifts you have settled on a core passion - one that is at the root
of all the rest.

Once you have settled on your core passion, finding a way to use it should be easy. When you start following your passion and using it to serve others, you life will get happier and uplifted; guaranteed.


 

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